On the road again

This was meant to be a spontaneous blog, come home and I’d slap together this clever witty, fluffy piece on Rotorua. Best laid plans, my good intentions wafted off into the ionosphere never to be seen again.

The man and I just love an excuse for a holiday. Road trips are a firm favourite. My husband’s recent birthday provided us with an excuse. The birthday boy’s wants and desires were paramount. A massage had to be part of the package. Taking that into consideration there was only one possible destination, The Polynesian Spa in Rotorua.

Rotorua is a tourist hot spot, with that in mind, accommodation was our first priority. It had to be walking distance to the city centre, restaurants, bars, etc. Jet Park Rotorua fitted the bill. We had stayed here the previous year; breakfast is part of the deal.

Escaping Auckland on a week day is problematic, travelling from the rural west and heading south is fraught, traffic jams galore. Adopting a common sense approach we decided on a leisurely mid-morning start.

Arriving in Rotorua, we donned our tourist hats.

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Memories of the Pink and White Terraces, destroyed when Mount Tarawera erupted in 1886.

Rotorua, the city of tulips.

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First stop Whakarewarewa Village, it must be at least twenty years since our last visit.

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Yay, for my Ellsworth coat. Whakarewarewa is a geothermal wonderland, boiling hot pools and bubbling mud.

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I tried very hard to capture a mud hiccup here, after dozens of photos I gave up.

You’ve heard of the Terracotta Warriors.

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Now I give you the TerraWhaka Warriors

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A relaxing afternoon was spent at the Polynesian Spa. An afternoon in the Retreat, a relaxing soak in the mineral pools overlooking Lake Rotorua, followed by a leisurely massage and a restorative tonic.

The Trip Advisor Gods were consulted before deciding on where to dine. We both have a penchant for the different. Rotorua didn’t disappoint, Che Chorizo and Ali Baba Tunisian Takeaways were superb.

I marvel at what this blog has become. Has it fulfilled its original intentions, yes and no? I started out all teachery. Funnily enough when I was immersed in that other realm, called education, I didn’t have time to blog. The creativity was squished out of me, tired and exhausted this blog collected dust. Now I have time to be me.

I have always been a writer, I thought I might write a book one day, don’t hold your breath. I wanted to do a Master’s Degree in Writing, then I discovered others wanted to steer my boat. I am not good at doing what I’m told. What The Colour of Knowing has given me is a vehicle to express myself in a guarded way. A chance to play with words, big words that I wouldn’t ordinarily use. It makes me feel clever. Most importantly I’ve discovered that if you don’t use it you lose.

So here I am three years on, The Colour of Knowing came out of a very dark place, a poem I wrote after a distressing day in the classroom. A poem I will never share. It has evolved into a mish mash that is me, the teacher, the adventurer, the creator of wonderful things and the occasional writer. Hold on tight and enjoy the ride.

Ka kite ano.

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Posted in Christine Haynes Ellsworth Coat, Holidays, resorts, travel, travel destinations,, Home, new zealand, Rotorua, The Polynesian Spa Rotorua, Whakarewarewa Village | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Tunic Bible Review and a bit of other stuff?

For those of you in a hurry skip to paragraph seven for my review.

I learnt to sew through necessity. Television did not exist in my childhood world and when it finally came along I was in my early teens. We found other ways to entertain ourselves. I learnt to knit, crochet and sew. The ability to create was surreptitiously instilled in us from an early age. I married young; handicapped by a mortgage I sewed clothes once again through necessity. It became part of who I am, part of my culture. Some of my efforts were successful others a dismal failures. I like to think I learnt from my mistakes.

I briefly dabbled in pattern cutting courses, two semesters of study, I failed to complete the course but boy did I learn a lot during those evening classes. My mother, who I inherited much of my talent from, proudly presented me with Volume 1 and 2 of The Modern Tailor Outfitter and Clothier (1950), they have pride of place in my library and I have drafted patterns from them.

Over the last two decades I have continued to sew intermittently. Other things have taken priority, raising children, surviving the bumpy road called life. Four years at university and I became a teacher, my trusty sewing machine sat on its antique table waiting for me to return.

With sewing on the back burner, teaching consumed me in a good and bad way. My passion for writing reignited, out of both necessity and a desire to have a creative outlet. Writing with my classes during our weekly Juicy Writing sessions allowed me to dwell on and write about, all manner of things, even sewing.

One such writing lesson inspired by Colin Thompson’s, How To Live Forever, transported us into a world of ‘book houses’. A fantastical library which came to life at night. Doors and windows appeared on the library books, trees grew, staircases meandered and chimneys billowed smoke.  We invited ourselves into that world and imagined what it would be like to live there. What would you see when you entered your book house?

Naturally, following my passion I chose a sewing theme.

MY BOOK HOUSE

Book house

As the front door swings open, the burble of a well-oiled Bernina resonates off the cluttered walls. Bolts of delicate silk, flimsy organza, luscious velvet and tweed sit, stacked in a far corner. Like soldiers standing to attention, row after row of pattern blocks hang, waiting expectantly, in an antique wardrobe. Cluttered mahogany shelves line the left hand wall. Jar after jar of buttons, lovingly sorted, classified by colour, a kaleidoscope, competing for shelf space. Reel after reel of cotton, carefully stacked and sorted in tiers. A leather grandfather chair sits by a large bay window, basking in the late afternoon sun. Needlework, intricately embellished, lies expectantly by the chair, waiting for a spare moment. Half finished, incomplete garments tease, torment, titillate and tentatively beg for a final stitch, a carefully executed buttonhole or a flourish of lace and ribbon. While in the corner, hangs a testament to the seamstresses’ skills, an exquisite heavily embroidered crimson velvet coat.

The Review

Which makes it all the more poignant that I am now here, back doing what I love sewing, and writing about it. Here is my review of The Tunic Bible by Sarah Gunn and Julie Starr. On-line reviews played a part in the purchase of this book. It’s a beautifully presented book, one pattern and you have endless possibilities. Over the last few months I’ve mulled over what I would make first. With summer in mind I threw ‘wobbly upper arm syndrome’ out the door and decided to focus on a couple of sleeveless tunics.

I’d have to admit that I was a little over whelmed by the prospect of using this book. When I finally threw care to the wind and started reading, I was pleasantly surprised with how easy it was to use. Patterns were traced, muslin sewn, those dam darts had to be lowered, with perfect results.

My first choice was the Inside-Facing Wide Split Placket with angled collar. Using a floral cotton I had purchased in Samoa. The comprehensive instructions made construction of the tunic seamless. The most complex part was sewing the trim on accurately.

I have to admit that interfacing and I are not good friends. I’ve had some disasters in the past and I now often stiffen collars and facings with another layer of fabric rather than interfacing, which I did here. This tunic is a loose fit, no back darts.

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Buoyed on by the success of my first tunic I was torn. Should I make a sleeveless tunic with a ruffled neckline or an Outside-Facing V-Neck Placket? I chose the latter. I had an unusual piece of fabric which I had picked up in Japan and a small piece of silk my sister had given me from India. Lots of colour happening here, I’ve always been a risk taker when it comes to colour. Any problems I had with this little number were of my own making. The silk facing took on a life of its own and I’ve stupidly decided to use the same silk to finish off the armholes. Probably not a smart move, watch this space!  Adding the contoured back darts made a huge difference.

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These photos aren’t the greatest, my photographer is at work, it’s a very grey afternoon with a foul thunderstorm raging outside. Not the best lighting for good pictures. As you can see this is still a work in progress. I’ll update the post with a completed picture asap.

The Tunic Bible is something I will continue to use. The possibilities are endless. Happy sewing.

Ka kite ano.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Review, Sewing, Tunic Bible by Sarah Gunn and Julie Starr, Tunic Bible Pattern Review, Tunic Bible, One Pattern, Interchangeable Pieces | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

In praise of Mesa

I have well and truly got the sewing bug. Fortuitously I have the gift of time. Add to that downloadable PDF patterns that are sooo easy to use, a much-loved repaired sewing machine, an antique baby over locker that keeps on keeping on and you have the perfect breeding ground for a new wardrobe.

I haven’t yet dipped my toes into on-line shopping for fabric, that’s coming. There are a few problems to overcome, my fear of buying the wrong thing, some companies don’t post to New Zealand and the cheap skate in me loves a bargain. Exploring a fabric shop, the smells, and the colours, touching swathes of material, fossicing through the remnant box, imagining possibilities, playing with ideas and forgetting that I’m an old dame who shouldn’t be dressing like that, is one of my favourite pastimes. Anyway my relative isolation is going to force me into on-line shopping for fabric ….eventually.

I always read reviews on patterns, now it is my turn to return the favour. This is my review of the Mesa dress by Seamworks. A simple little number to construct, I have made three. I’ve become a fan of dresses. The jeans and little tops have been discarded, or are languishing in the back of my wardrobe. I have been fortunate, tall and slim my weight never varied, until menopause knocked on my door. Now my weight fluctuates, just enough to be annoying, my waist has thickened and no amount of exercise or good eating is going to change that. Hence, my love of all that stretches.

I cut out the medium size, made up my muslin. There was a teeny tiny gape at the neckline as mention in other reviews, not enough to worry about. I’m quite wide in the shoulders which may have compensated for this?? The medium was a little snug around my old lady waist and hips so I’ve added a smidge on there.

Having my photo taken to plonk all over the internet is not my favourite thing to do. This particular version was made with winter in mind, a heavier knit fabric, worn with a black polo merino underneath and black leggings, the perfect outfit on a chilly day. It is only just warming up here and this dress is a firm favourite.

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Toffee to the rescue and I start to relax. A summer version, in a lighter weight knit. All the fabric was purchased at Centrepoint Fabrics in Auckland. I adore this dress. The hem gave me some grief, I always have problems hemming lightweight knits. This hem was hand sewn in the end.

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Mesa is a dress I will continue to make. Happy sewing.

Ka kite ano.

Posted in Colette Patterns Mesa 3013, Sewing Pattern Review, Colette Seamworks Mesa Dress, Home, Mesa by Seamworks, Mesa pattern by Seamworks, PDF Downloadable Patterns, Review, Sewing | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Should I stay or should I go??

Holidays, where do I start? We all holiday in different ways, in different places and we all have different expectations of that event. Choosing a holiday destination that suits is fraught! Will it tick most of the boxes? Where do we go? How much can we afford to spend? What sort of experience do we want? Does this style of holiday suit my family situation? All questions, which require answers.

Which leads to my next point? When planning a holiday there are for the sake of this story, three distinct types of holidays.

Firstly, the stay in the one spot, type of gig. Where you sip cocktails around the infinity pool, dabble in leisurely beach activities, lie in your partner’s arms watching the sunset and dine on tropical delights before slipping between smooth wrinkle free sheets. (According to the man I never make the bed properly. He likes smooth sheets, I can sleep on anything).

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Anyway getting back to the point ……

For those of you with wanderlust, the need for adventure, there is the organised tour. The jump on the roller coaster, hold on tight type of gig. You sign up for the short or long haul, want to see as much as possible in a short period of time, planes, trains, buses and vans are your legs. Immerse yourself in the cultural experience, the smells; a guide is often your constant companion. Being part of a group is a prerequisite. Depending on the destination it can be both confronting and awe-inspiring.

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IMG_2515#1Then there is the compromise holiday, rent a house, rent a car, you are free to choose what you do, cook your own meals, dine out, shop like a local. I love exploring local supermarkets, food markets at dawn, the smells, the noise, the people. It’s illuminating.

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Our recent trip to a South Pacific resort has made me realise that I don’t enjoy the stay in the one spot type of gig. I can see their appeal if you’ve just finished a mind numbingly exhausting tour and you need some respite. Two days in an idyllic setting, lashings of gorgeous food, splashing about in a pool and I would be looking for my Get out of Jail Free Card.

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Being trapped at a so-called top rated resort recently, was not enjoyable. Bad food, sloppy service and an umbrella as our constant companion sums up the week. A beach hut that had very limited supplies of snorkelling equipment, most of it in disrepair, meant that snorkelling to dispel boredom was not an option. Rubbish littered the seafloor, empty beer bottles on the beach.

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We found ourselves planning days out, paying for a rental car so we could seek out decent food. Consequently, resort style holidays have now been put on the back burner until I need a Zimmer frame to get around. My appreciation of my home, New Zealand has grown as I travel. I am truly blessed.

Where to next to, possibly Morocco? India beckons, Sri Lanka shows promise. Or maybe we should cruise the canals and rivers in England? Oh and let’s not forget shopping for fabric in New York’s Garment District,  Mood Fabrics here I come. The possibilities are endless. Most importantly I should probably get back to work so we can afford the next holiday.

Ka kite ano.

 

 

Posted in Holidays, resorts, travel, travel destinations,, Home, new zealand, Reflective statement | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Let’s not talk about the weather please

Winter is starting to drive me nuts. I can feel lots of eye rolling right now particularly from my younger sister who lives surrounded by a squillion metres of snow for months during winter.

Anyway, it just won’t stop raining here. Gumboots are my footwear of choice when walking the dog. Speaking of which, I desperately want to take her for a walk right now. Unfortunately there’s a gargantuan wall of water heading our way. On a positive note rainbows are forever decorating our skyline, little pots of gold tantalisingly close.

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Let’s not talk about the weather!

I was inspired by a recent little sojourn to create a Juicy Writing teaching resource. As an add-on, to my recent sixtieth birthday celebrations we planned a getaway, Wellington our starting point. The man and I love the vibe in Wellington city, the food scene is something else, vintage clothes shopping in Cuba Street a must and if you haven’t stayed at the Museum Art Hotel you really are missing out.

Our flight into Wellington was uneventful. I have immense admiration for pilots who land here in high winds; it certainly gets the adrenalin pumping. Lunch at Sweet Mothers Kitchen, our first stop. An eclectic crowd, good food, mulled wine and the latest issue of The Zippy Saver to peruse, perfect! Off to Cuba Street to shop, our purchases in hand we seal the deal with a Murphy’s Stout. Cocktails in the Hippopotamus Bar followed by dinner at the popular Istana Malaysia a short walk from the Museum Art Hotel. With my feet up I cast my eye over the latest edition of Capital Magazine and The Zippy Saver realising that I have struck teaching gold. My scissors at the ready …..

Isn’t it ironical, the teacher in me never sleeps? More about that resource later.

Without boring you too much we were booked on the 9am Interislander ferry to Picton the following morning. My other half, who is not comfortable in rough seas, was a reluctant participant. I had reassured him that his good lucky fairy (me) would protect him. Bearing in mind that as I write this blog all Cook Strait ferry crossings are cancelled due to high swells and high winds. We thankfully sailed on a picture perfect day.

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Goodbye to Wellington

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Passing the Interislander Aratere in Tory Channel.

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Picton

Organising a rental car is always problematic if you plan on ditching it somewhere off the beaten track. You end up paying a premium. The man was keen on trying out a Subaru Legacy. Very impressed with our trip across Cook Strait we disembarked and located the desk of a popular rental car company. Oh my goodness, it always worries me when we are told not to worry about the damage to the car because you have full insurance. We were greeted by a dunga. This car had had a hard life, it wallowed on corners, suspension problems I suspect, we cautiously drove to Blenheim.

A delightful lunch at St Clairs Vineyard Kitchen highlighted the issues that traffic has to deal with travelling to Christchurch, after the recent Kaikoura earthquake. Large trucks surrounded as we drove to our lunch destination on a previously quiet little country road. By the way our lunch at St Clairs was yummy!

Off to Nelson via Havelock. The other half repeatedly mourning the fact that The Mussel Pot Café in Havelock was closed for the off season. If you’re into mussels this is a must do. We wend our merry way up hill and down dale to Nelson. It seemed to be further down than up! And no we hadn’t had too much wine with our lunch.

I love Trip Advisor, the man and I always consult the Trip Advisor God’s. We don’t always follow their advice but it helps. Our accommodation for the night was booked so we were walking distance from our restaurant of choice, The Oyster Bar and Eatery. This is a must visit, a delightful host, gorgeous oysters patiently waiting to be shucked, an open kitchen with lovely chefs, tempura oysters to die for, succulent pork gao bao buns, beef empanadas, finished off with a power packed affogato sloshed with orange liqueur. We were in heaven.

After a restless night’s sleep, according to the man I sat bolt upright in the early hours of the morning and asked where the dog was! Bearing in mind Toffee is not meant to sleep on our bed …. As previously discussed she does! The man, after thinking what is the old battle axe on about, calmly replied, “Sharyn, we are in Nelson!”

After ditching the dunga the following morning at Nelson Airport we were astounded by the packed terminal. Renovations were happening; it was full to the brim with travellers. Apparently the airport now copes with 480 flights every week. My how things are changing. We live in an outstanding country, I can see why people flock here to enjoy the sights. Back home to Auckland, the new Waterview tunnel shortening our trip home. Yes, rain still falling.

Getting back to that resource. My creative juices tend to flow more freely when I’m out of my comfort zone. Armed with my trusty bag of stationery goodies, I cut out, played on my computer, and indulged in a little Art Journalling. I would like to thank the creators of The Zippy Saver and the contributors to Capital magazine for the kick start.

Let’s not talk about the weather page 1#

Let’s not talk about the weather page 2

This resource should be printed on A3 paper.

I will use this resource in Year 4-8 classes. If you’re not sure what I am rattling on about with this Juicy Writing stuff, please refer to my earliest posts.  When relieving, I don’t expect teachers to plan for me. As a full time teacher planning for a reliever when you’re unwell is the last thing you feel like doing. I appreciated not having to do that. I am now returning the favour.

I haven’t included an exemplar. If you find them helpful let me know. Feedback is important. I always model writing in front of a class and we write a class exemplar together prior to independent work.

Stay warm.

Ka kite ano from down under.

Posted in Creative writing, Juicy Writing, new zealand, Teaching Writing, writing resources | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Let’s not talk about the weather please

Winter is starting to drive me nuts. I can feel lots of eye rolling right now particularly from my younger sister who lives surrounded by a squillion metres of snow for months during winter.

Anyway, it just won’t stop raining here. Gumboots are my footwear of choice when walking the dog. Speaking of which, I desperately want to take her for a walk right now. Unfortunately there’s a gargantuan wall of water heading our way. On a positive note rainbows are forever decorating our skyline, little pots of gold tantalisingly close.

IMG_1542

Let’s not talk about the weather!

I was inspired by a recent little sojourn to create a Juicy Writing teaching resource. As an add-on, to my recent sixtieth birthday celebrations we planned a getaway, Wellington our starting point. The man and I love the vibe in Wellington city, the food scene is something else, vintage clothes shopping in Cuba Street a must and if you haven’t stayed at the Museum Art Hotel you really are missing out.

Our flight into Wellington was uneventful. I have immense admiration for pilots who land here in high winds; it certainly gets the adrenalin pumping. Lunch at Sweet Mothers Kitchen, our first stop. An eclectic crowd, good food, mulled wine and the latest issue of The Zippy Saver to peruse, perfect! Off to Cuba Street to shop, our purchases in hand we seal the deal with a Murphy’s Stout. Cocktails in the Hippopotamus Bar followed by dinner at the popular Istana Malaysia a short walk from the Museum Art Hotel. With my feet up I cast my eye over the latest edition of Capital Magazine and The Zippy Saver realising that I have struck teaching gold. My scissors at the ready …..

Isn’t it ironical, the teacher in me never sleeps? More about that resource later.

Without boring you too much we were booked on the 9am Interislander ferry to Picton the following morning. My other half, who is not comfortable in rough seas, was a reluctant participant. I had reassured him that his good lucky fairy (me) would protect him. Bearing in mind that as I write this blog all Cook Strait ferry crossings are cancelled due to high swells and high winds. We thankfully sailed on a picture perfect day.

IMG_1422

Goodbye to Wellington

IMG_1451

IMG_1470

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Entering Tory Channel

IMG_1502

Passing the Interislander Aratere in Tory Channel.

IMG_1514

Picton

Organising a rental car is always problematic if you plan on ditching it somewhere off the beaten track. You end up paying a premium. The man was keen on trying out a Subaru Legacy. Very impressed with our trip across Cook Strait we disembarked and located the desk of a popular rental car company. Oh my goodness, it always worries me when we are told not to worry about the damage to the car because you have full insurance. We were greeted by a dunga. This car had had a hard life, it wallowed on corners, suspension problems I suspect, we cautiously drove to Blenheim.

A delightful lunch at St Clairs Vineyard Kitchen highlighted the issues that traffic has to deal with travelling to Christchurch, after the recent Kaikoura earthquake. Large trucks surrounded as we drove to our lunch destination on a previously quiet little country road. By the way our lunch at St Clairs was yummy!

Off to Nelson via Havelock. The other half repeatedly mourning the fact that The Mussel Pot Café in Havelock was closed for the off season. If you’re into mussels this is a must do. We wend our merry way up hill and down dale to Nelson. It seemed to be further down than up! And no we hadn’t had too much wine with our lunch.

I love Trip Advisor, the man and I always consult the Trip Advisor God’s. We don’t always follow their advice but it helps. Our accommodation for the night was booked so we were walking distance from our restaurant of choice, The Oyster Bar and Eatery. This is a must visit, a delightful host, gorgeous oysters patiently waiting to be shucked, an open kitchen with lovely chefs, tempura oysters to die for, succulent pork gao bao buns, beef empanadas, finished off with a power packed affogato sloshed with orange liqueur. We were in heaven.

After a restless night’s sleep, according to the man I sat bolt upright in the early hours of the morning and asked where the dog was! Bearing in mind Toffee is not meant to sleep on our bed …. As previously discussed she does! The man, after thinking what is the old battle axe on about, calmly replied, “Sharyn, we are in Nelson!”

After ditching the dunga the following morning at Nelson Airport we were astounded by the packed terminal. Renovations were happening; it was full to the brim with travellers. Apparently the airport now copes with 480 flights every week. My how things are changing. We live in an outstanding country, I can see why people flock here to enjoy the sights. Back home to Auckland, the new Waterview tunnel shortening our trip home. Yes, rain still falling.

Getting back to that resource. My creative juices tend to flow more freely when I’m out of my comfort zone. Armed with my trusty bag of stationery goodies, I cut out, played on my computer, and indulged in a little Art Journalling. I would like to thank the creators of The Zippy Saver and the contributors to Capital magazine for the kick start.

Let’s not talk about the weather page 1#

Let’s not talk about the weather page 2

This resource should be printed on A3 paper.

I will use this resource in Year 4-8 classes. If you’re not sure what I am rattling on about with this Juicy Writing stuff, please refer to my earliest posts.  When relieving, I don’t expect teachers to plan for me. As a full time teacher planning for a reliever when you’re unwell is the last thing you feel like doing. I appreciated not having to do that. I am now returning the favour.

I haven’t included an exemplar. If you find them helpful let me know. Feedback is important. I always model writing in front of a class and we write a class exemplar together prior to independent work.

Stay warm.

Ka kite ano from down under.

Posted in Creative writing, Juicy Writing, new zealand, Teaching Writing, writing resources | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Simple Things That Make You Smile

Despite my best intentions I’ve been absent from blog land for a number of weeks. I got busy, I’ve been back in teacher land, bouncing between classes. Spending my days with little people, medium sized people and young adults who almost look me in the eye. Loving every moment of it. The down side is that I have now contracted bubonic plague, well almost.

I’ve just turned sixty. Pretty special really, apart from the wrinkles and a few minor ailments, being sixty doesn’t worry me. Leading up to my birthday the usual questions were asked. “What do you want?” The lovely man wanted to buy me the world.

The answer was, not a lot! Just the things that make me smile. I’ve become a minimalist, sort of. We’re ignoring my wardrobe of course.

Where was I? Yes, what makes me smile? That heart-warming smile that costs nothing. A smile that makes you feel all fuzzy and warm inside. Funnily enough, it’s the simple things.

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An annoying dog who wants to play

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An exquisite flower in my garden

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A funky teacosy

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A pot of pansies

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My cupcake pincushion

A picnic at the beach, an unexpected hug, a compliment, a smile across a crowded room, creating something wonderful, teaching a new skill, laughing with someone, time with friends, Sunday dinners with family, spending time with my stroppy caring man. Etcetera, etcetera, etcetera………….

Oh, I feel a teaching resource coming on. So here we, The Simple Things That Make Us Smile Juicy Writing resource.

Simple things exemplar 

Template simple things

I modified the template for publishing in a YR 3 class. Available below.

updated simple things.pdf#1

I used this in a classroom two days ago. When I announced that we were going to do Juicy Writing I was greeted with cheers. I kid you not! See my earlier posts if you don’t know what I’m burbling on about. We had a wonderful time, lots of new language and the artistic class members were in heaven. I used the doodles drawn by Liz Pichon in the Tom Gates series as inspiration. A resounding success.

The best things in life are free: take the time to notice them, the simple things. The things that make us smile!

Ka kite ano.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Art, Creative writing, Juicy Writing, mosaics, Teaching Writing, Writing ideas, writing resources, writng resources for teachers | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment